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Friday 10 May 2019 10 May 2019

Expressions 100% Aussie to know absolutely (part.1)

Expressions 100% Aussie to know absolutely (part.1)

Aussies have their own language, so if you want to have a conversation without looking like a bogan, follow the guide!

An original pronunciation

All your schooling we tried to teach you the British accent? By watching American series, you're playing it pretty American? Forget everything you know, because in the land of the kangaroo, pronunciation is exaggerated!

The sounds in -a /-ay will be pronounced as -i, for example "day" sounds like "die", "mate" as "ma-ite".

Australians pronounce -or as -eahs, for example, "you" becomes "yeah" or "ya"

Similarly, the sound - y / -i as "buy" or "nine" sounds like a -oy /-oi : we get "boy" and "no-ine".

Okay, you know what I mean? So now, a little vocabulary....


Expressions to know to understand an Aussie

Australians use many strange expressions, to be adopted urgently to be in the vibe:

"G'day"

It is pronounced "guday" and simply means "good day". It is used at the slightest opportunity.

"Mate"

Synonymous with buddies, Australians punctuate their closing sentence with a long and powerful "maaaate" to inspire friendliness: "Do you want a beer, mate? ", "Look, come to the beach tomorrow! »

"Ta"

As you can see, Australians love tight words. No "thank you" at home, to say thank you one "your" is enough!

"No worries"

Abbreviation for "don't worry about that". More than a simple expression, the Australian "no worries" is a way of life, one could even say a national motto. This expression comes from Australia's characteristic culture of relaxation and conviviality, a bit like "akunamatata". This term is used in many circumstances, it can mean "no worries" or "relax" and punctuates the sentence.

"Good on ya"

It is used to show its approval, a bit like "well done" or "good work". Beware, it can also be used sarcastically.

"Crikey"

While the millennials punctuate their sentences with an "OMG" (oh my god), the Australians say "Crickey, what was that? ", an expression popularized by Steve Irwin, the TV host, crocodile hunter.

"Bogan"

It's the case with society, the in-laws, so if they call you "bogan" it's not really a sign of affection.

"I'm stuffed"

While Americans use it when they are full, Australians use it to say they are exhausted.

"Chockers"

is used to say that something is full, for example if you are no longer hungry, you say "I'm chockers! ", it can also be used if a place is packed "the cinema is chockers".

Here we have gone through the basic expressions so as not to lose face on an Australian evening, but there are still many terms to learn. No worries, the rest in a future article!

PS: In case you haven't understood, the "Oz" of Café Oz is for... Australia of course! "Oz" (which is pronounced "auss") is simply a contraction of "Australia" and to avoid complicating things, Australians call themselves "Aussies"! 

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    Are you a professional? You wish a private space? Click here

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